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Tech

In relation with our latest post about the car industry passenger entertainment – oriented strategy for the future, we came back with another (lighter) piece.

As Forbes states, everybody and their brother (is) getting into the autonomy game. You may see below the highlights of some of the most remarkable innovations to be, in this field:

 

Audi – Holoride

The autonomous driving vehicle treats its passengers with a virtual reality video game (Holoride). The car captures motion stimuli via sensors and integrates data into the game. Syncing the VR space with the passenger’s movements is the key feature in this environment. Apparently this is both fascinating and nauseating, as an online article mentions.

 

Intel and Warner Bros – Gotham demo

In a retrofitted 2019 BMW X5, the passenger immerses into a virtual ride with the help of a large screen TV, projectors, mobile devices, audio and lighting.
Meanwhile, they can keep an eye on how the trip is going on via a tablet in the middle of the passenger area.

 

Panasonic – the autonomous SPACe_C e_Torta concept

This time it’s about a modular vehicle platform, fully electric, fully autonomous. The passenger is also the focus. The interior environment can become “a food truck, a mobile meeting space, a delivery vehicle, a mobile pop-up retail store and a mobile educational presentation space”. The modular click-on, click-off architecture enables the person sitting in the back of this vehicle to adjust its functionality. The SPACe is also prepared for self-driving inputs.

 

Hyunday – Virtual Touch

Yes, it features a face recognition technology and a way of assessing the driver’s emotional state.
But furthermore, the Hyunday’s Mobi division concept car includes a way to switch to autonomous driving mode from manual. Once in autonomous mode, the passenger can choose to watch a video material on the windshield.

 

Mercedes-Benz – Vision Urbanetic

 

Seemingly, a vehicle straight out of a SF movie, the Urbanetic is another modular car concept that runs off batteries and can operate autonomously. It features a people module and a cargo module. Also, it monitors traffic and weather and it communicates with the exterior in various ways. Thus it may anticipate the need for transportation or the presence of pedestrians before they are visible with the naked eye.

Image credit

 

*Good to know

Remember that LASTING Software is the right partner and the natural choice for automotive custom software development. We handle the automotive industry’s specific requirements with a winner combination of creativity and hard work. Our software engineers cover specific automotive areas, such as:

–              Human Machine Interface

–              Graphics Software Development Kits

–              Mobile apps

–              IoT apps

–              Enterprise software

–              Analytics and Big Data

–              Quality Assurance Services


LASTING Software is active in the automotive software development sector for the past +17 years. We are based in Timişoara, a focal point within Romania’s competitive automotive-focused software market.

An HMI-focused team activates in LASTING Software since the beginning. Our team’s exposure to complex HMI projects, industry-specific tools, workflows and processes has grown constantly. Our commitment empowered us to deliver quality software on time, every time. We simultaneously took on increasingly ambitious projects. Our rate of customer retention is high, with 4.7 years being our current average customer “age”.

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Tech

Three main predictions for the next decade of vehicle manufacturing – and an array of new (ish) concepts. These could expand into further predictions, some of them unexpected, as time goes by. Passenger economy enters, with a full set of consequences.

Between manufacturing and usage, the auto vehicle and automotive industry is set to need increasingly more software solutions, the more versatile, the better.

Estimated production-related shifts

 

The experts estimate that two main types of automobiles are the future. First, there are the minimalist, simplistic vehicles. Tey will be mass produced, on demand, to satisfy the customer need of getting from point A to point B. Secondly, we’ll have highly customized vehicles that answer the need for expensive, (almost) one of a kind products. Both variants involve autonomy.

Also, for both types production would involve a high level of automation. This would “require a total re-imagination of every process involved”.

Automakers expect major changes, implying a 50 percent cut in the industry workforce, as well as a process of re-skilling the employees that remain.

With this in mind, the vehicle production industry braces up for:

  • Different workflows, processes, and operations (e.g. reduced time between R&D and production)
  • Reducing the shop-floor logistics roles by around 60 percent
  • Emerging new roles (and the demand for new talent: “the number of software engineers needed will rise by as much as 90 percent”)

The passenger economy moves the focus towards autonomous vehicles and in-car infotainment

 

Taking for granted the time spent by passengers inside their vehicles, the industry develops new ways of keeping them entertained. With the new world of autonomous vehicles at the horizon, drivers become potential viewers or members of the audience. Once their attention free from the road ahead, they will also be available for screens, an audience open to video and audio entertainment once captive inside the cars of the future.

We stumbled upon an article that reviews a few of the approaches towards autonomous driving, as showcased this year at CES.

Hitachi presented driving assist technology, as well as preventive maintenance concepts and remote car-summoning solutions.

Panasonic is all about IoT and the concept of connected mobility. In their take, autonomous cars are an “immersive version of your smartphone”.  Entities such as “advertisers, entertainment equipment providers, social media companies, data and analytics companies” are all welcome to fight for the passengers’ attention, in their view.

BMV is set to conceal all the technology underneath a minimalist interior, looking almost like a living room, and establishing continuity between the residence and transportation environments. In their version, the driver can “make video calls, manage their to-do list, read a book, and even watch TV from the comfort of their car”.

 

A future of easier transportation, depending upon the automotive software solutions

Once vehicle autonomy perfected, it’s all about the experience. How does one use the time spent inside a vehicle of the (not so far away) future?

Hopefully, not dealing with software errors, buffering screens and frustrations. Depending on the quality, seamless integration and versatility of the software solutions making a smooth experience possible, the vehicles of the future should be relaxing, as well as useful in the way smartphones are nowadays.

As always, the details will make or break the entire concept. Thus, the passenger economy needs great software solutions. It needs dedicated coding, patience, attention and agility.
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News

This week we focused on autonomous vehicles, inspired by this Innovation Enterprise post that targets the decisional factors inside organizations. All those concerned need to prepare in advance for the incoming changes that are set to affect industry after industry. Just to have an idea about the scale of the disruptions, their certainty and their character, let’s go through this topic, the way the mentioned publication approached it.

Autonomous vehicles will pervade the logistics and transportation fields, and the legal adjustments point to this

Firstly, we should notice that the article looks at the way autonomous vehicles progress in the US environment. Therefore the presented implications and legal changes are in relation with this geographical area, for now.

The Department of Transportation recently issued a new guidelines document of 70 pages. The officials stated that they changed the definition of “operator” and “driver”, to allow for AI-driven vehicles.

Based on this major change, those in charge of businesses in which such vehicles might play a role in the future should prepare in advance. Exactly how will autonomous vehicles impact such businesses? Advice for determining the future impact of the changes to come is included in the article.

Mapping out what companies will drive this type of change is yet another step in the process of getting ready for it. Autonomous vehicles come with AI (Artificial Intelligence). Companies such as Google, Tesla, or even Dominos Pizza made no secret out of their AI commitment.

Besides keeping an eye for the moves of such innovators/adopters, investing in stocks related to AI is a second option many will consider.

 

Going fully driverless means high technology and overcoming any security issues in autonomous vehicles

Analysts have estimated that going fully driverless is an option that could become real in transportation around 2030 or half 2040s. We are talking trucks and goods delivery, and the figures already point out considerable cost saving benefits and not only.

The road to this stage may seem long and surely it’s a winding one. However, the first official and regulatory step may well be the new definition of what a driver is.

On the other side, road safety and cyber security concerns show the need for high-performance, fault proof software and hardware. Those solutions that guarantee the safety of all those taking part in traffic are the only way to move forward.

Going fully driverless in transportation and delivery does not yet have consumer acceptance. Autonomous vehicles still have some way to go until convincing the majority of people they are in no way a risk on the road. In any case, they still have to prove not being a bigger risk than the vehicles with human drivers.

Autonomous trucks generally officially operate at what’s known as Level 2, an engineering standard that includes technologies such as automatic braking, acceleration, and some amount of steering. (Basic cruise control, by contrast, would amounts to Level 0, and certain features such as lane-assist or adaptive cruise control would be Level 1). However, autonomous trucks are often effectively operating at Level 4 – or “high automation,” with their safety drivers generally only taking over on local roads.
– Richard Bishop, an automated vehicles industry analyst, quoted by US News

Image credit: curbed.com

 

 

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