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This week we focused on autonomous vehicles, inspired by this Innovation Enterprise post that targets the decisional factors inside organizations. All those concerned need to prepare in advance for the incoming changes that are set to affect industry after industry. Just to have an idea about the scale of the disruptions, their certainty and their character, let’s go through this topic, the way the mentioned publication approached it.

Autonomous vehicles will pervade the logistics and transportation fields, and the legal adjustments point to this

Firstly, we should notice that the article looks at the way autonomous vehicles progress in the US environment. Therefore the presented implications and legal changes are in relation with this geographical area, for now.

The Department of Transportation recently issued a new guidelines document of 70 pages. The officials stated that they changed the definition of “operator” and “driver”, to allow for AI-driven vehicles.

Based on this major change, those in charge of businesses in which such vehicles might play a role in the future should prepare in advance. Exactly how will autonomous vehicles impact such businesses? Advice for determining the future impact of the changes to come is included in the article.

Mapping out what companies will drive this type of change is yet another step in the process of getting ready for it. Autonomous vehicles come with AI (Artificial Intelligence). Companies such as Google, Tesla, or even Dominos Pizza made no secret out of their AI commitment.

Besides keeping an eye for the moves of such innovators/adopters, investing in stocks related to AI is a second option many will consider.

 

Going fully driverless means high technology and overcoming any security issues in autonomous vehicles

Analysts have estimated that going fully driverless is an option that could become real in transportation around 2030 or half 2040s. We are talking trucks and goods delivery, and the figures already point out considerable cost saving benefits and not only.

The road to this stage may seem long and surely it’s a winding one. However, the first official and regulatory step may well be the new definition of what a driver is.

On the other side, road safety and cyber security concerns show the need for high-performance, fault proof software and hardware. Those solutions that guarantee the safety of all those taking part in traffic are the only way to move forward.

Going fully driverless in transportation and delivery does not yet have consumer acceptance. Autonomous vehicles still have some way to go until convincing the majority of people they are in no way a risk on the road. In any case, they still have to prove not being a bigger risk than the vehicles with human drivers.

Autonomous trucks generally officially operate at what’s known as Level 2, an engineering standard that includes technologies such as automatic braking, acceleration, and some amount of steering. (Basic cruise control, by contrast, would amounts to Level 0, and certain features such as lane-assist or adaptive cruise control would be Level 1). However, autonomous trucks are often effectively operating at Level 4 – or “high automation,” with their safety drivers generally only taking over on local roads.
– Richard Bishop, an automated vehicles industry analyst, quoted by US News

Image credit: curbed.com

 

 

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